Métis student expresses her cultural passion through art of photography

Marissa (1)
York University student Marissa Magneson and her
photograph "Frozen Chains of Childhood". Click here
for larger picture. Click here to see the photograph.

Submitted by: MNO Education and Training Employment Developer Rachelle Brunelle McColl

Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) citizen Marissa Magneson is a Bachelor of Fine Arts student specializing in Honours Music at York University in Toronto. She is highly involved with the Aboriginal Student Services at York  and her photograph " Frozen Chains of Childhood" was showcased at the Undergraduate Research Fair, York's Research Leaders Gala, The Spadina Gallery and online with the school's website Revue Your Review e Journal.

As outlined in her Artist Statement of the photograph "Frozen Chains of Childhood" reflects the isolation and pain that many Indigenous children endured in Canadian residential school system. Bound, Isolated, frozen and neglected are just a few words to describe this piece and the lives of many residential school survivors. In working towards rebuilding culture, communities and identity through education and social-political actions, perhaps over time we can melt the chains that once bound Métis people.

Marissa has been an Academic Resource Advisor at York University, plays the Viola with the York University Symphony Orchestra and sings Soprano with the York University Gospel Choir. She is also known as a musician for the Toronto Rehabilitation Centre, is an Accompanist at the Rimito Flamenco Dance School in Toronto and is an Academic Tutor for the Disabilities Centre at York University.

Marissa is a confident and proud Métis Woman who through her academic research and passion for photography hopes that through open discussion and awareness through the arts to continue to melt the chains that still bind Métis people.

Marissa is very grateful for the love and support from her parents, family, music teachers and Aboriginal community and would not be where she is today without them.

Posted: June 16, 2017

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